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CODY PAULSON

April 9 – June 4, 2015
Duluth Art Institute, Corridor Gallery
Reception: May 14, 5 - 7 PM

From the remnants of this century old industrial boomtown, to the shores of the world's largest unsalted sea, Cody searches our city for an aesthetic that is intrinsically Duluthian. 

Found Horizons

KAREN OWSLEY NEASEWarmth of a Distant Sun SM

April 30 - June 4, 2015
DAI George Morrison Gallery
Reception: May 14, 5 - 7 PM

The Horizon is the apparent line that separates earth from sky. It is at once visible and fictional – we can never physically touch the horizon except through perception. This paradox is the visual source material for the work of Karen Nease as well as an apt metaphor for her inspirations as an artist. Nease mixes the natural terminology of landscape painting with a modernist understanding of formal concerns. She utilizes the golden mean and the gridded square alongside a nuanced understanding of nature’s ever changing colors and moods. Building almost sculptural layers of paint into her finished pieces, Nease provides the viewer with a physical exploration of the often metaphysical entity of Duluth’s Lake Superior horizon.

The Poetics of Evolution

Halliday1

CAROLYN HALLIDAY

May 14 – July 9, 2015
DAI John Steffl Gallery 
Reception: May 14, 5 - 7 PM

I use the vocabulary of textiles to create sculptural forms that often reference body or nature. The quiet repetition of a stitch is central to my existence. Hand knitting wire and other nontraditional materials, usually re-cycled, is my primary technique although I incorporate other needlework and fiber skills into my work. I am always intrigued by the process of converting a discovered material into a form that I call a textile.  Simple elements of my daily existence: a found stick, a scrap of metal, or coffee beans may become the seeds of a piece. I intend to magnify nature, reference concepts of the feminine through body and domesticity, and examine life’s daily debris. Carolyn G. Halliday